It’s a Small, Small World

Early spring in the Ozarks is a mixed bag. Soon the hills will erupt in color, but not just yet. The trees are still bare but budding. Sometimes if you want to see what’s going on you have to get closer – much closer.

I have been getting up close and personal with nature – collecting shots with my Leica Macro lens. Sometimes when you get close you see beauty or complexity in the most mundane things. Color emerges, structure is revealed, discoveries are made.

The dandelion is far more complex that it appears from the seat of my mower deck. The center is almost crystalline

The dandelion is far more complex that it appears from the seat of my mower deck. The center is almost crystalline.

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These cover the fields all over this area – they look like a floating purple cloud from a distance. Up close they are more leaves than flowers, but those flowers are so delicate – less than an eighth of an inch across.

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I love johnny-jump-ups, and these remind me of those but much, much smaller. This tiny violet is less than a half-inch across.

From eye level this looks like moss on a rock. When you get down to ground level it is much more complex than expected.

From eye level this looks like moss on a rock. When you get down to ground level it is much more complex than expected.

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These hyacinths are at the end of their cycle. They mysteriously appeared a couple of years ago after my neighbor encouraged me to plant bulbs in the remains of an old cistern.

I don't know what these are, but they look a lot like some I have seen in my neighbor's flower beds. They are new this year. Thank you garden fairy!

I don’t know what these are, but they look a lot like some I have seen in my neighbor’s flower beds. They are new this year. Thank you garden fairy!

 

Here's a closer shot of that blue flower - there is so much structure to these flowers when you get close.

Here’s a closer shot of that blue flower – there is so much structure to these flowers when you get close.

I think this is some form of bluet - it measures about a quarter inch across.

I think this is some form of bluets – it measures about a quarter-inch across.

I'm pretty sure this is southern bluet. Tiny and white.

I’m pretty sure this is southern bluets. Tiny and white.

Is this the face of an owl? Nah, it's just the shell of a black walnut - it was probably a winter  meal for a squirrel

Is this the skull of an owl? Nah, it’s just the shell of a black walnut – it was probably a winter meal for a squirrel.

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The field around the Stone House is a mix of blue grass, clover, and low ground cover like this. An inch-long feather rests atop the ground cover.

I don't know what this is, but it is very tiny - smaller than a head of a pencil. It is so small that it's color is not even visible until you get very close to the ground.

I don’t know what this is, but it is very tiny – smaller than a head of a pencil. It is so small that its color is not even visible until you get very close to the ground.

I see these every year, they are low - under the grass. This one seems to have extra petals.

I see these every year, they are low – under the grass. This one seems to have extra petals. I love its star-shaped foliage.

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This is ice – water frozen in the bird bath.

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Daffodil buds emerging.

Water condensing inside the stalk of a daffodil.

Water condensing inside the stalk of a daffodil.

Getting these shots required me to get down in the dirt and undergrowth. Getting closer is not always easy, but is usually worth it.

45 thoughts on “It’s a Small, Small World

  1. Wonderful macros (and I think it might be a grape hyacinth you were asking about).

    I’m always amazed at the detail in some of these early spring blooms which are so tiny. Thanks for sharing them.

  2. Now these photos are really out of this world… magnificent macros… I love them… just shows when one gets down and closer to the ground there is just so much to see… wonderful share…

    • Thank you – I love shooting macro because you see all that when you get close – flowers have such complexity. The blue on that flower is amazing – it is really that blue.

  3. Beautiful pictures, as always, Lorri. I love the tiny white ones, and the ones with the star backdrop.

    And yes, that’s definitely a hyacinth. I can tell because the moment I saw it my nose ran. I have few allergies, but the year that every secretary in my office got a hyacinth for Secretary’s day — there were 50 or so of them — introduced me to that special feeling when your respirator system shuts down. But outside, from a distance, they are one of the prettiest flowers.

    Ahhhh, choo!

    • Sorry to make you sneeze 🙂 I love the tiny white ones too – so detailed.

      I’m allergic to almost everything, but those don’t seem to bother me. Being inside and enclosed space with them though – that would be awful if you were allergic to them. Yikes!

  4. Gorgeous, these are, Lorri! 🙂 The cluster is grape hyacinth (one of my husband’s favourite flowers and we have several in our garden), they come in white as well. The tiny weeny little flower is probably a Speedwell. It’s about the same size as a forget-me-not flower.

    • Thanks Val – Speedwell – I googled it and I think that’s it! I love the hyacinth – It came up just a bit after the pink hyacinth. I just discovered it yesterday.

    • Thanks Kathleen – I love seeing these in the springtime. I really don’t know much about what most of them are called – there are so many typed. I love spring! L

  5. Do the blue ones open up wider? They look like what my mother used to grow called bluebells. They are all beautiful. It’s amazing what one can find when one really stops long enough to look. You have a great eye Lorri!

  6. Lorri, I love that little blue flower whose colour you can’t even seen unless you bother to get close enough to look! It reminds me of how easy it is to NOT notice people, their gifts and talents and the contributions they make in our world…unless we actually get up close and really look. ❤

  7. Great photographs, all of them!
    I think these blue flowers (you’ve also seen in your neighbour’s flower beds) are called muscari. The complete latin designation is Muscari botryoides.They are bulbous plants and you can find them in different shades of blue and in white. The are in my garden, too. ^^

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